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VW - in at the deep end (stolen from Ian)

DCiAdmin

Always room to learn a bit more
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#1
I am loving the VW that I purchased. The only problem I have had with it is one that I caused. I used 5 - 20% Bio diesel and apparently that's a big no-no in VW's. That threw the exhaust gas temps out of range and gave me engine codes for several days. I think now that I might have clogged or fouled the EGT sensor. Hope that's not too costly to resolve.

The car will break 100,000 miles on Friday. I can't believe that I have put almost 2,000 miles on it in just 3 weeks. My daughter and I have had a great time taking some late night drives. But the down side of that is that the Timing Belt should be replaced about now. I got a quote today from an independent European repair shop and they said $1200. Yikes! or something similar is how I replied. The Service Tech said "yes, but that includes the water pump" Are VW water pumps made of gold? Or is it the timing belt? :)

Anyone know if I can manage this repair or the EGT sensor on my own? I'm thinking that it's time for me to become handy.
 

Cameldung

I Like It Here
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#2
I hesitate to say anything about Bio diesel, it seems to bring out very strong opinions from both for and against camps, but if that vehicle was mine, or a customer of mine would recommend nothing but normal low sulphur diesel, or Ultra Low Sulphur. Talk to your VW man about it and the ramifications, some of which you may have already seen. It is possible once you run some quality fuel through the system the sensor may behave again? Also ask your VW man about "regen" (this will vary depending on the exact model)

Do not put off replacing the timing belt because the $1200.00 cost will pale into insignificance if the belt lets loose. It is quite normal to replace the water pump at belt change intervals as they have been known to fail immediately, or soon after belt replacement. The reason for it is that the water pump has a pulley that also acts as a timing belt pulley, and a newly installed, and tensioned belt "can" impose loads on a used water pump that lead to rapid failure of the pump. I have witnessed this in my role as a specialist consultant many times when failure of these items occurs after timing belt replacement, and then the siht hits the fan when there's a blue about who pays to fix the mess up. ALL parts are expensive these days, VW included, the pump would be more expensive than the belt.

If you have to replace the EGT sensor go to your VW man, special tool needed, and it may well be seized in place.
 

DCiAdmin

Always room to learn a bit more
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#3
CD - have I told you lately how appreciated you are here? :) Thank you for the sound advice!

I have had the misfortune of a timing belt letting loose and ruining an engine. That was an expensive lesson, and it was only a simple Chevy gasoline engine. I shudder to think of the costs of the TDI.

Yes, I'm staying far away from Bio diesel now. I had not realized how different it was from the straight Ultra Low Sulfur.
 

Lord Chance

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#5
Btw: If my memory serves, the EGT sensor is in the exhaust manifold near the turbo. In fact there may be two sensors. One upstream of the turbo and one downstream. CD is correct when he says that the sensor may be seized in the manifold. Whoever replaces the sensor should use a proper anti seize compound on the threads avoiding getting any on the sensor itself. :)
 

driver_ian

In at the Deep End...
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#6
So much good advice given for the Lady here Gentlemen...
May I add that here in the UK Bio Diesel is still something of a rarity on fuel forecourts and some vehicle insurers won't cover those that use it....

Follow the advice T and get that belt changed... You already know of the damage that's caused when one breaks.... a well maintained m̶o̶j̶o̶ motor will give you far better reliability and service.

Just as a side note my employer recently paid £500 (US $811) to replace the cam belt on my Ford Galaxy 7 seater... and that did not include replacing the water pump...
 

DCiAdmin

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#9
The highly praised Bio-Diesel works great in pre emissions diesel vehicles. Where it falls flat is the new electronic engines. It simply gums up the calibrated sensors. :)
Which is likely why I'm getting the current engine light. I'm hopeful that a tank or two more of regular low sulfur diesel will get that cleared up. Hopeful, but not counting on it.

Thanks, guys! Appreciate the advice!

Oh, and OUCH, Ian. I guess that $1200 isn't so bad. But better deal - I think I've found a mechanic that will only charge me $800. Yippee!
 

Cameldung

I Like It Here
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#10
The highly praised Bio-Diesel works great in pre emissions diesel vehicles. Where it falls flat is the new electronic engines. It simply gums up the calibrated sensors. :)
Yes Sir, if you are going to use Bio then make sure its in an oldie, even then its still a risk.

The use of Bio in common rail systems is a recipe for a certain bad day looming. CR injectors for one thing don't like it, and cost a fortune to renew.
 

DCiAdmin

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#12
Gosh, it's been a month and 21 days since I first posted about the Check Engine Light coming on. The DPF light is on now as well. Because of that, I haven't driven the car for more than 10 miles in weeks. It spent 2 weeks down in my driveway and 2 more weeks at the local mechanic. I have been through a myriad of possible solutions since things went bad. EGT sensors (B1S4 , post turbo, and B1S1, pre turbo) have both been changed out without any resolution.

After talking with my mechanic and a few others, the final diagnosis is that the emissions system has gone south on me. I've made the decision to tow the car 3 1/2 hours to a VW tech with experience doing DPF deletes on Passats. I've heard too many horror stories about things gone wrong when the tech isn't experienced with VWs. My local mechanic hasn't done a VW, but he has experience with pickups and semis.

Tessa and I will load the car onto a tow dolly tomorrow and head southeast. The exhaust system will ship from Canada to the VW mechanic and is expected by November 10th. I hope to have the car back by mid-November.

At the moment, it seems that I have a very lovely German paperweight. :)
 

DCiAdmin

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#14
I am about to go to Illinois to pick up my car from the Performance Tune shop that removed the emissions crud. All seemed to go well with the removal - no new codes in response to his work. However, there was one last code to fix. I was terrified that it was going to be a bad turbo based on the code and the possible causes. The mechanic found an air pressure hose off of the turbo that had cracked. That should be the end of the repair saga. I'm hopeful anyway.

I'll be driving it back. I don't dare put it on the tow dolly again. Not after my drive to Illinois when the tow dolly broke at the tongue. Thank God we had pulled into a gas station to check lights and straps and not on the highway.
 

DCiAdmin

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#16
Home safely and with a car that is great fun to drive. The reprogramming of the ecu and the DSG has done wonders for horsepower, torque & fuel mileage. Hate the expense, but it seems to have been well worth it.
 
Last edited:

Antman

Because, you know, Obama.
Advisor
#17
Your inbox is too ****ing big.
Speaking of...

BOLO for a new member (Chuck Braun) with an IMAP problem. OP reports Outlook will open once, but when closed will not open again.

Managed observation reveals that this is NOT true.

Outlook opens properly, but when 'closed' Outlook does not close. Process remains terminated. When 'opened again', nothing happens. Unless you wait for a long time. OP had never waited a long time before asking for help with "possible virus" problem.

OP has two mail accounts. One local PST at reasonable size and an IMAP account with a 1.21 gigawatts mailbox. Great Scott! I mean 19.8 GB IMAP data file.

OP advised to archive IMAP folder. I do not know how. Referred him here. Problem is mission critical.

http://www.ihelpforum.com/index.php?threads/how-to-archive-imap-inbox.46425/
 

DCiAdmin

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#18
Have I mentioned lately how happy I am with my VW? I have had a high of 48 mpg for one of my commutes and this tank is averaging 40 mpg for the tank. I'm getting used to how to drive this peppy version of my car. And really loving it!